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Desert Rain Frog

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Desert Rain Frog

Sign up today to support
our effort to assess 160,000
species like the Desert Rain Frog by 2020

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Desert Rain Frog

Sign up today to support
our effort to assess 160,000
species like the Desert Rain Frog by 2020

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Vulnerable
AMAZING SPECIES

Desert Rain Frog

Breviceps macrops

The Desert Rain Frog, Breviceps macrops, is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM. It occurs on the Namaqualand coast of South Africa, north to Lüderitz in coastal south-western Namibia. Interestingly, this frog is fossorial which means it has adapted to burrowing and underground living, without water, burying itself in sand dunes vegetated with low vegetation.

Although a locally common species, the overall population of the Desert Rain Frog is in decline due to the loss of the quality and extent of its habitat. This is mainly as a result of coastal opencast diamond mining, but also from the development of roads, increasing pressure from human settlement and land-use changes (e.g., grazing by livestock).

Currently there are no known conservation measures in place for this intriguing looking amphibian. Unfortunately, its highly fragmented distribution does not lie within any protected area. In order to conserve this species in the long-term, it should receive full protection through the establishment of protected areas within its range.